Fan Share Purchases Double At Lincoln City

Lincoln City fans are following in the footsteps of what founded Britain’s industrial and commercial revolution.  The joint stock limited company, one where individuals can buy shares, as many or as few as they can afford and dream of better.  Let us aspire to inspire. Such an oaks from Acorn concept inspired, the canals, the railways and the turnpike road system, that gave Britain the route to greatness. It can and will put Lincoln City back on the righteous path.

Thank you for reading Neil Gentleman-Hobbs

 

 Lincoln City F.C. badge.png

 Let us aspire to inspire. Lincoln City is an institution to its only true lifelong stakeholders – the fans. The folk who weather the terraces on cold Tuesday nights, or crowd around their radios listening to BBC Radio Lincolnshire’s  Sportin Hortin and Tommo cursing ill-luck at the hands of referees.  We are there in body or spirit willing the Mighty Imps on to better days.

Back in 2009 a share saver scheme was the first thing to be put in place by the original founders of the 12th Man – HERE. The plan was to give the fans – the stakeholders from the stands –  a chance to become shareholders. Bit by bit their acorns – yours too potentially – have and will continue to grow. It is based on the principle that you give something that you would not miss, in return for something only we fans can value, pieces of paper, with our names on, neeth the Mighty Imps name,  showing we own a part of our community club. For investment in football is far different from normal stocks and shares. Profit comes not from dividends in pounds, shillings or new pence.  No this is about the greater good, with love and the pursuit of the dream far outweighing any common sense.  Those pieces of paper are ours for keeps, in your hand you hold your share of Lincoln City FC, the mighty Imps.

The 12th Man share saver scheme has gone about its business, quietly, but remarkably. There is no pretension, no grandeur, just a smooth running accounting function that puts the electronic banking in place for its members to buy shares, bit by bit.  Then Paul Wilson (the unselfish bean-counter so to speak) sends over a cheque along with a list of shares due and the board nod them through. Then the certificates – those precious bits of paper – come back by return. In the last month the monthly savings have doubled but there is plenty of room for more.

To make it easier on the club and to reduce any admin cost – to ensure all funds go where they are most needed and indeed desired – shares are purchased every 3-4 months. The  purchases consist of whatever each individual has contributed in that time. You will get a certificate to the value of shares purchased ie. if you have paid £80 during the period, you will get a certificate from LCFC for 160 shares. Paul sends one cheque but encloses an application form for every individual and existing member. Seamless, flawless but priceless and the 12th Man share saver scheme is growing fast.

If you wish to join please leave a comment at the bottom, it will not be published as potential and existing shareholders have a right to remain anonymous, bar any fellow shareholders who wish to peruse the official share register. This will be forwarded on to Paul Wilson. He will email you a standing order form.

Buy as many or as little as you wish, safe in the knowledge that you are following in the footsteps of millions of small independent shareholders who have aspired for better.

Advertisements

Posted on August 23, 2012, in Fundraising ideas, Writers - Neil Gentleman-Hobbs and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: